Category: Personal

Empathy as a Form of Communication

Receptive and Expressive Language All communication has two aspects: receptive language and expressive language. Receptive language is what we hear and understand. Expressive language is what we say to others. I believe that empathy is also a form of communication; one that is as essential to each of us as is spoken, written, or signed …

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Double Delight at Jiminy

I had a doubly wonderful experience today at Jiminy Peak. The conditions were absolutely spectacular. The only things I didn’t like were the crowds (well, it was a weekend, after all, which I usually avoid, but the forecast for tomorrow is for yuck — the “r” word-that-shall-not-be-spoken), and the pesky clumps of white fluffy stuff …

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Who’s the Scientist Here?

My friend Ariane has written a post about her reaction to being attacked by someone who didn’t agree with her writing. If you know Ariane or have benefited from reading her blog, please go there and place a supporting comment. I did. I think we all know how traumatizing it is to be criticized in …

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Neurobabble and All That

Neuroeverything After reading a couple of articles recommended by friends, I am going to have to rethink how I describe my reading habits. I have been saying I devour pop-science books on neuroscience. (Of course, I do read a lot of other things, too, on evolutionary biology, philosophy, ethics, autism, and more.) But it seems …

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The Stockbridge Munsee Tribe

Chief Wilcox, Sherry White and Barbara Allen honor Mohican life in Stockbridge The “Chief” of this headline is not an Indian Chief, but my brother Rick, the Chief of Police in Stockbridge, Massachusetts. As explained in this nice blog post, he has carried on the tradition of staying in touch with the original inhabitants of …

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A Special Autism-Friendly Screening of The Curious Incident of the Dog in the Night-Time

A Special Autism-Friendly Screening London’s National Theatre in HD The Curious Incident of the Dog in the Night-Time Saturday, November 3 at 2pm http://www.mahaiwe.org/events.html Recommended for ages 13 and up $10 Reserved Seating Here’s a nice article in the Berkshire Eagle about the performance, and my involvement in it. I will be leading the post-screening …

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More on the Mystery of Executive Function

Those of us who are neuroexceptional are known to have difficulty with many of the cognitive processes that fall under the general rubric of “executive functions.” Why is that? If I knew that answer to that, there would probably be a Nobel Prize waiting for me. Still, I have given this a lot of thought. …

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Is There An Autistic Personality? Part II

In which I continue my unscientific search for common features of the autistic personality. In Part I of this series, I noted several discordances between autistic characteristics, as I see them, and standard personality types. I believe these will prove to be the keys to understanding (hey, wait, don’t keys “unlock”? – add that to the …

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Fledging From Free Food to Freedom

Yesterday was fledging day at my house. For several weeks, as I awoke at first light, I was greeted by the chirping of what was clearly a large crop of nestlings, as their parents brought them their breakfast. Finally, the day had come for them to leave the nest and fend for themselves. What is …

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Boredom and Its Antidote: The Importance of Adults

Being autistic is a way of being in the world. Those who are blessed with the special perspective given to us by our autistic neurology are also cursed by the fissure that appears in our interactions with non-autistic (neurotypical) people. It is only natural for all people to assume that others think the same way …

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